Tag Archives: Bark Bay

Able Tasman Coastal Track – day 3

Day 3, Nov 25, 2018 –  Bark Bay to Awaroa (13.5 km)

Sleep was partial in the hut. Breakfast was chapati with condensed milk and coffee, carbohydrates for the morning walk. From the hut, I could barely make out the orange signage indicating the low tide track. All along the track, there are signage and markers (triangular or round), especially along the coastal track. The track is well maintained. We left around 0730. Deposited our packs on the beach for collection by water taxi to our next stop, Awaroa. We took the high tide track, which led inland.  The day was cloudy but no rain or wind. The air was muggy and cool under the coastal forest canopy. A sea of Manuka trees and tree ferns hindered views of the sea.

Day 3 – Bark Bay to Awaroa
Day 3 – Bark Bay to Awaroa

Crossed the Waterfall Creek via another suspension bridge. Water swiftly flowed over boulders towards the sea. Along the track, you would see yellow wasp traps and other traps set up by DOC. We eventually descended towards Tonga Quarry. Little remains of the granite quarry reminded us of past settlers’ life. Across the water, Tonga Island. Now, seals had taken refuge here. After another bush walk, views of idyllic Onetahuti Beach emerged. Rocky outcrops, emerald green water and golden sand beach made it an inviting proposition. Kayaks laid on the beach. A great place for lunch.

Day 3 – Bark Bay to Awaroa

We continued crossing a Maori bridge and an all tide crossing boardwalk. This diversion meant, no more waiting for the tidal crossing on Onetahuti Beach. From the beach, it is uphill walk into the Tonga Saddle. We reached a signage, Awaroa Lodge and Awaroa Hut. We head towards Awaroa Lodge as our packs are deposited at Awaroa Beach, next to the lodge. This is private land, a non-DOC track. If the timing for a low tide crossing is possible, take this track. Perhaps have some tea and lunch at the Lodge while waiting for the tide to drop. We arrived around 1200, collected our packs but made a ‘big’ decision. Although we had bookings at Awaroa Hut, we decided to stay at the lodge for the night. Hot shower and a fancy meal. A little indulgence to sample all of Able Tasman Park. There is a pizza outlet as well. Stunning Awaroa Beach was recently passed on from private to public ownership through crowd funding. Water taxis collected and dropped off passengers, day trippers and lodge customers. A big day tomorrow, to cross the Awaroa Inlet. There is no high tide option!

Day 3 – Bark Bay to Awaroa

Nearby, there is a small grassy airstrip to bring the well-to-do customer to the lodge. Planes have been flying in and out throughout the day. Finally, the ‘unusual’ weather that hit South Island descended on us. At dinner time, it poured heavily, and it continued through the night. We carefully packed all our packs as from here-on, there is no public water taxi service.  At least, a comfortably bed tonight.

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Able Tasman Coastal Track – day 2

Day 2, Nov 24, 2018 –  Anchorage Bay to Bark Bay (8.7km)

After a quick breakfast, we left calm Anchorage Bay around 0630. The sun was just peeking through thick clouds. Oyster catchers and cormorants were the only residents on the beach. The reason for the early departure is to walk across Torrent Bay Inlet at low tide. This would save us an hour’s hike on the high tide track (11.7km). Therefore, when planning to hike in the park, knowledge on tide time is critical especially on Day 4, across Awaroa Bay Inlet. There is no high tide track.

Day 2 – Anchorage to Bark Bay
Day 2 – Anchorage to Bark Bay

There is an open expanse of sand and mud at Torrent Bay Inlet. A stream of water flowed out to sea that must be negotiated. Probably from Cleopatra’s Pool and Torrent River. At places, it was just below my knee. We waded through the inlet in about 20 minutes. That led us through a quiet Torrent Village. They were perhaps holiday homes. It was a substantial village. From here-on the track meandered inland passing through several streams. The lush forest kept hiking cool.

Day 2 – Anchorage to Bark Bay

Around 9am, we crossed a wonderfully clear Falls River via a suspension bridge. Sunken logs clearly visible under water with old man’s beard (lichen), hung off trees on the river banks. Towards the later part of the track, it drizzled lightly. It became darker under the trees, shrubs and tree ferns canopy. Having left early this morning meant we arrived early at our hut at Bark Bay, around 1115. It was high tide. Collected out pack from the beach near the camp sites. It was slightly wet from the late afternoon drizzle. Bark Bay hut had 34 bunks.  I took a quick cold shower, courtesy from a hose. Time for some lunch and rest. The day stayed gloomy and the sky grey. The resident DOC staff, Phill, was a humorous guy with lots of information and wise cracks. We managed to get a ‘private room’.

Day 2 – Anchorage to Bark Bay

It became routine to start dinner early. Lights through solar power lit the dining room intermittently. I had packed some miso with noodles and rice with ready to eat Indian meals. As per day 1, there were lots of meal sharing. Some of us had packed too much food. I strolled out to the bay, at low tide, walked across soft sandy beach. Some hiker had collected mussels off the rocky coast for dinner! Still, there was no wind! The surrounding forest was still as it was well sheltered. Early to bed but no need to catch the low tide the next day. Both low tide and high tide tracks took about the same time to walk. Sleep in huts is never easy as hikers sleep in close proximity. Ear plug might be a solution.

 

Able Tasman Coastal Track

5 day hike on the Able Tasman Coastal Track in November 2018. Stared at Marahu and finished at Totaranui. Then returned to Marahu by water taxi. Beautiful lagoons, lush native forest, emerald green and turquoise water, tidal inlets, wild life, creeks and rivers and lots more.