Hiking the Red Tarn Track, Mt Cook

Red Tarn Track is located at Aoraki Mt Cook National Park, New Zealand. This is a half day (one-way) track with an elevation gain of 300m.

A short drive to the public car park and shelter is the starting point of the track. First walk through beech forest at Governors Bush Walk. With a short stroll, we emerged out of the bush and easy walk across Blackbirch Stream bridge. From thereon, it is a uphill climb through a series of steps (est 1750 only). This is Mt Sebastpol, the lowest mountain in Aoraki Mt Cook NP.  As I gained elevation, panoramic views of Mt Cook, Mt Sefton and Mt Wakefield, the village changed. The vegetation also changed with the elevation.The track twists and turns, always ascending. At one point, the climb is over rocks and steep in places.

With more steps, eventually, I walked onto a small meadow of alpine plants. A place to sit, snack and read the interpretive board. A few more steps, we reached two small tarns. The red (tarn – alpine lake) is derived from the reddish carnivorous pond weed Drosera spp – Sundew plants, that grew on the fringes of the marsh. A great place to see the reflections of Mt Cook (evening). We lingered for a while. A couple of ducks flew into the cold pond for a bit of frolicking. The tarn is a great place for reflection – views and life, I guess.

Beyond the tarns, a track leads up on rough slopes to the summit of Mt Sebastapol. Some serious effort is required for this hike.

The views of the mountains and alpine scenery is superb. This demanding (due to numerous steps) track is worth the 2hrs return climb.

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