Tag Archives: Hiking in New Zealand

Rakiura Track photos

This are my photos of the 3 -days Rakiura Track (March 2021) in Stewart Island, New Zealand. Please read Hiking Rakiura Track.

Hiking Rakiura Track

Table of Contents

Day 1 – Lee’s Bay to Port William Hut

Day 2- Port William to North Arm Hut

Day 3 – North Arm Hut to Half Moon Bay (Oban)

Track information

Rakiura Track is on Stewart Island, the third island of New Zealand. This 32 km track is a loop and can be walked in either direction. It is generally referred to as a “muddy track” resulting from the constant rainfall it received. For more track information, refer to DoC – Rakiura Track. Stewart Island (or Rakiura – the Land of Glowing Skies) is an old world charm, laid back where 85% of the land is wilderness; heaps of beaches and isolated coasts; native rain forest; wildlife and spectacular night skies with potential to see Aurora Australis (Southern Lights). This is old New Zealand! See my track photos

Day 1 – Lee’s Bay to Port William Hut (8km)

We organised a taxi to the official starting point at Lee’s Bay. This saved 5 km of walking (2 hrs). Greg, our diver enquired if we had witnessed the Southern Lights last night. We were disappointed that we missed it. There was some apprehension and uncertainty at the time of our walk as both huts had serious infestation of bed bugs. However, DOC assured us that it is manageable and the huts as “relatively safe”.

It was a bright and sunny day with a blue sky when we arrived at Lee’s Bay. The beach is spectacular, strewn with rocks, lush coastal vegetation and washed-up kelp on the white sandy beach. The tip of South Island – Bluff, is visible across the unpredictable Foveaux Straits. On the island, several mountains are visible including the highest – Mt Anglem. Closer, on the track, on the ground, local humour – a metal plaque with the inscription “someday I must go over to New Zealand”.

We started our hike at 9 am after passing through a chain link art installation (Te Puka). In Maori history – Maui fished up South Island (Te Wai Pounamu) and Stewart Island (Rakiura). Then, anchored them to a chain. The dawn sunbathed the beach with a soft glow. The light was amazing. However, the water was cold. A predator fence can be viewed across the eastern hills. After a short walk, we took the high tide route. Crossed a few small wooden bridges. We passed a cluster of multi-trunk kamahi trees. The track ascended along a coastal cliff, mostly under tree canopies of beech, kamahi, tree ferns and broad leaf. There were stunning views at Peter’s Point and along Wooding Bay. Crossed white sandy beaches surrounded by lush vegetation. The track ascended and descended with aid of steps. Bird songs filled the forest. We were always on a look out for the elusive Kiwi bird. Wishful thinking perhaps.

We eventually emerged out of the forest canopy onto the long white sand Maori Beach. Amongst the sporadic shrubs, we spotted a deer. A family was enjoying a picnic lunch. This is an old Maori settlement. Tucked into a collection of tall shrubs, remnants of a rusting historic boiler. Timber industry was big in these parts including Port Williams between 1860 and 1930. We walked along this long beach under a hot sun with yellowish giant kelp washed up on the beach. At the northern end of Maori Beach, a swing bridge spanned over an estuary. We crossed the bridge and the track ascended into the forest. There were less bird songs here. At a junction, a track continued north towards Port William. The left track lead towards the North Arm Hut. After a short walk, we descended towards Magnetic Beach and arrived at the Port Williams Hut around 1230. Be aware, the dreaded sand flies await!

A deer foraged in the compound under a handsome collection of blue gum trees. For now, we were there only ones at the hut. It was quite surreal and quiet. Incidentally, there were lots of bees and tui birds. Nearby is a wooden wharf of Port Williams. Weary of the bed bugs, we kept our packs in the dining hall and planned to sleep here as well. With plenty of daylight, we relaxed under the gum trees and walked along the beach. A single cruise boat anchored at the wharf. Several hikers arrived later in the day. With the bed bug scare, only twelve were here today. The hut warden was absent.

I was excited and hopeful to see wild kiwi birds as Rakiura promised to have a sizeable population of these shy and elusive birds. There are sensitive to bright lights and noise. Armed with a torch wrapped with red cellophane, I was eager to get out on the search. After 9 pm, several red-light beams penetrated through the forest floor. I managed to spot a foraging deer and a possum. A distinctive loud screech of a kiwi echoed in the forest nearby. None was sighted but they are definitely around.

Day 2 – Port William to North Arm Hut (13km)

As expected, the day began as cloudy with dark clouds. Early in the morning, I ventured into the bush looking, rather optimistically, for Kiwi. We finally left the hut at 0830 and retraced our track back along the coast for 1 km. Then divert right and inland. It began to rain lightly. Humidity was high. I was sweating profusely with my rain jacket on. We stopped to check out the historic log hauler site. It was abandoned in 1931 after the timber industry collapsed. The abandoned machines are reminders of an era gone by. Via a long steep wooden step, we descended into the mixed forest -rimu, totara, podocarps, beech and tree ferns. Yellow autumn leaves littered on the track. We crossed little streams and walked past matured trees with twisted trunks. Lichen and moss hung from branches. All added a dramatic image of the forest.

The track undulated with the ebb and flow of the rain forested mountain. There was little birdsong. The track is a combination of earth, gravel, wooden steps, ponga (tree fern) logs and mud. The early part of the track was dominated by tall tree ferns with clusters of broad leaf trees. Patches of mud made walking difficult. This was further exasperated with exposed tree roots resulting from leeching by heavy rainfall. Today’s rain was light and did not contribute to the deteriorated state of the track. Fortunately, several dry days prior, had made walking rather easier than normal (very wet and muddy most of the track).

Mid way point is marked with a ball hanging off a tree branch. More muddy patches to negotiate. The final stretch is a descend towards the coast into North Arm Hut. We were the only hikers here. Several staff and contractors were busy ripping and spraying pesticide to get rid of a persistent infestation of bed bug. The rain eased and surprisingly the sun was out. However, thick clouds hung just below. Strong south-westerlies blew across the coast and hut. Temperatures dropped. We took a shot walk through dense vegetation towards a very small sandy beach. Wind swept trees clanged strongly onto the sloppy shore. A deer wandered into the hut compound.

Dinner time in the hut is full of camaraderie between the hikers. No burners are available in this hut. A few other hikers also arrived from Port William. A wild deer foraged around the hut compound. The wind picked up and rained intermittently. Doug, the warden, gave the usual hut talk. Another young and enthusiastic warden, Ant, offered anyone to spot Kiwi later. “I’ve got a bright red light”.

At 10pm, Ant, turned up and most of were ready for some surprise. The cold wind was relentless. This may have prompted the wild kiwi to stay hidden in the bush. In this cold windy day, I would too. However, the night sky – the milky way, was stunning. LC and I continued our search, Hoping. No sighting though. As a precaution against the nasty bed bugs, we slept in the lounge.

Day 3 – North Arm Hut to Half Moon Bay (Oban) – 12km

Surprising, at breakfast, no one experienced any bites. Perhaps we were just lucky. Left the hut at 0840 and entered a matured forest. Not long after, the track weaved in and out between the forest and the coast. Last night’s rain caused the already muddy track to become worse. New impromptu tracks were created to forge forwards. The walk is quite invigorating especially near water bodies like fast flowing streams. We stood on a bridge listening to the soothing sounds of the crashing waterfall.

Through twisted trunks of native bush, we spotted an abandoned and rusting boiler (used by the timber industry). We later emerged out of the tree canopy and walked along the debris filled Sawdust Bay. It was low tide. The blue sky reflected on the shallow water to create a striking view. The sun was out. The forest began to take on a “refreshing” appearance. Shafts of light penetrated through the goblin like twisted trees. The ground covered with clumps of lime green ferns. The atmosphere was invigorating. Young rimu trees seemed to thrive here.

At 1100, we arrived at yet another historic timber processing site – Gallo’s Sawmill. The only visible reminder is the signage and the stream that was used to power the mill. After crossing a long wooden bridge over an estuary, we reached a short detour to Kapipi Bay. We thought this might be a pleasant place for lunch. However, cold wind blew across the choppy bay. Shellfish clung tightly onto the rocky shore. A few fellow hikers joined us. They were young and boisterous. They too decided it was best not to linger here too long. Yellow Autumn leaves were scattered on the track. We continued walking under tree canopy dominated by tree ferns.

At 1pm, we arrived at a junction. The right track led towards Half Moon Bay via Ryans Creek adding a couple of kilometres (2hrs). We took, the left track via the Fern Gully with a 1 hr return to Half Moon Bay. Incidentally, all the young hikers opted for this choice too. Within a few minutes, we had reached the end of the 32 km Rakiura Track. From here on, we walked on gravel road for another hour to reach Half Moon Bay (Oban). Despite the wet and muddy track and no sight of any kiwi bird (although we heard several screeching calls), Rakiura Track is a delightful track with a mixture of stunning and dense rain forest, enchanting structural native trees, coastal walk and unique ecosystems and habitats.

Hiking to Lake Emma Historic Hut

On our return journey from our hike to Mt Sunday, on the one main road, we stopped at Lake Emma and Roundabout. The sun was still bright and we decided to hike around the lake to a historic Lake Emma Hut. Against a backdrop of the looming Mt Harper and distant snow peaked mountains, Lake Emma is sits in an idyllic location.

From the car park, it is an easy walk along the shore. The vegetation is a mixture of tussock and grasses. Water reeds populated the water’s edge. A 4WD track, visibly used, led all the way to the hut. In the water, black swans flocked together foraging. We decided to walk all the way towards the historic hut on the south side of the lake.

Lake Emma Hut was built in the late 1860s. It is so quite here. Even the swans dare not disturb the silence. Entering the hut felt a little spooky. Above a cast iron wood stove, graffiti is scribbled all over. I did not linger too long. This hut is not in use. A track led behind the hut, skirted the foot of the Harper Range towards Lake Camp. A side trail detoured back to car park. However, it encompassed wading/crossing a swamp. We opted to retrace our track back to the car park. It seemed like a long slog back in the relentless hot afternoon sun shining directly onto our faces. It is an easy two hour return walk. We returned to Methvan.

Hakatere/Ashburton Lakes Wilderness

This morning we drove back to Mt Sommers and onward to Hakatere Conservation Area via the Ashburton Gorge Road. It covered about 60,000 hectares between two great rivers – Rakaia and Rangitata. The landscape is covered with tussock land, stunning lakes and braided rivers, bog and wetlands, impressive wild snow peaked mountains and farmlands. The Ashburton Lakes included Lakes Clearwater, Emma, Camp and Roundabout. All this just two hours drive from Christchurch.

At a historic Hakatere Station, built in late 1800, sealed road turned to gravel but the sights of snow peaked mountains and stunning lakes lifted my spirits. Driving carefully, I began to take in the ‘wilderness’ of this place. There is something exhilarating when I see clear water and snowy peaks. Here, those views are everywhere. There was hardly any car on the gravel road. We reached Lake Camp. Signs of civilisation. A cluster of permanent homes/batches towards the end of the lake. Interestingly, a public telephone! The Harper Range reflected on the still Lake Camp.

Driving across to Lake Clearwater, another cluster of camper vans occupied the lake’s shores. The Southern Alps, although distant reflected on its surface. The clarity here is astounding. I spoke to a local couple and they mentioned that all accommodation here are privately owned and there is no accommodation available. Perhaps, one or two owners may rent out their property by word of mouth. There are in fact a few properties/lodges available within this conservation area but are priced steeply! This included Lake Heron Station and Arrowsmith Lodge. Campsite and huts on some hiking tracks are available too.

We continued out slow drive on gravel road until we approached what looked like the end. Not really. We crossed a bridge near the mouth of Potts River which drained into the braided and wide Rangitata River. The sight towards the river basin and mountains was stunning. Gorgeous views of the head waters of Rangitata River – with sources from Clyde, Lawrence and Havelock Rivers, Mt D’Archiac, Mt Potts and Mt Sunday. All part of the magnificent Southern Alps. Soon, we passed the expensive Mt Potts Lodge. It is a long slow drive to get here but it is worth it. Plus,with options to climb Mt Potts and Mt Sunday. We choose Mt Sunday – the site of Edoras (Lord of the Ring).

Hiking the blue lakes and Tasman Glacier Track

Haupapa/Tasman Glacier Track (2.7km) is one of the easier walks in Aoraki/ Mt Cook National Park. The drive towards Tasman Lake is stunning. The grand views of Mt Johmson, The Armchair, Nuns Veil and several more just before crossing the Hooker River bridge is spectacular. The drive continued along Mt Wakefield to a car park.

From the car park, it is a gradual climb through a series of steps. With elevation gain, the Blue Lakes became visible, nestled at the base of the mountains. They were glacial lakes with a blue tinge. The blue, in earlier days, were glacial melt-waters permeating through moraines. Over time, the glacier height dropped and water flow diminished. With rain water, algae developed and turned the colour green.

Towards the top, the track is rocks and debris left behind when the glacier retreated. Today, Tasman Glacier is 27km, the longest in New Zealand. It has retreated significantly since late 1990s. That’s when the lake was formed. At this height, the snow and ice covered mountains which included Mt Cook, Mt Tasman, The Alcolyte and Nuns Veil were stupendous.

The fractured appearance of Tasman glacier’s terminal face, the dirt covered glacier head, the turquoise lake and the braided Tasman River (joined by the Hooker River) leading towards Lake Pukakai in the south, is quite a sight. Yes, the suggested walking time is 45 minutes. However, be prepared to linger much longer, in the cold, as the views here are quite captivating. Imagine, this lake was only created 20 years ago. Sadly, Tasman Glacier’s terminal face may retreat further with rise in temperature. Go now!

Hiking the Rocky Mountain Summit Track

The road from Wanaka passed through “That Wanaka Tree” and towards Glendhu Bay passing the start point of the popular Roys Peak Track. It was closed for lambing season. At Glendhu Bay, there were stunning views of Mt Aspiring and the surrounding mountains reflected on the pebbled beach bay.

The scenic ride continued into Matukituki Valley.  The road is hemmed between mountains, pastoral land with views of Lake Wanaka. The starting point of Rocky Mountain Hike is at Diamond Lake Conservation Area. (Refer to DoC for more information).

The start is a steep climb on gravel road and descends into the bush. The walk skirted the deep blue lake with sound of aquatic birds. At a junction, a series of wooden steps climbed onto the rocky mountain. It twisted and turned with buzzing sound of bees.  I took the eastern track which provided elevated views of Diamond Lake. Along the track were several specimens of flowering tree Fuchsia (kōtukutuku) with their distinctive brown barks peeling off. The view of the cobalt blue Diamond Lake contrasted by the greenery of the bush was stunning.

I continued on the eastern route and came into expansive views of Lake Wanaka, the surrounding farmlands and snow covered mountains including Roys Peak. It was quite exhilarating. The trail, now narrowed, zig zagged uphill over boulders and steep climb. Tui bird calls filled the mountain air. The views of the lake and mountains improved. Another choice. This time I choose the western route. Climbed over boulders, with all four limbs employed in places, on the way to the summit. There were fantastic views of Matukituki Valley. Finally a clearing and a grassy track led to the summit. On the west, snow and glacier covered peaks. A road zigzagged up the ski fields at Treble Cone Mountain. Mt Aspiring’s (Tititea, in Māori, means ‘steep peak of glistening white’) – icy sharp peaks and many more are visible.

The summit of Rocky Mountain is flat with a collection of rocks. On the east, great views of stunning Lake Wanaka, islands dotted around in the lakes, tail end of Matukituki River which drained into the lake and the mountains beyond. The climb is worth just for the expansive and spectacular views.

I retraced my steps back and circled Diamond Lake. Trees were lush with bird songs. On the water’s edge, marshes covered with reeds and other aquatic plants. As I exited the lake, a single duck fed frantically on the grassy marshes. This 3 hours return intermediate  hike is a great way to view this spectacular region.

Hiking Isthmus Peak Track

We left Wanaka and head towards Makarora on one of the most scenic drive along the blue Lake Hawea. We stopped at a dam on the lake near the small Hawea township at the southern end of the lake. Towards the north, snow peaked mountains of the Southern Alps. That was enough incentive for me to continue. The road twisted and turned with sharp hairpin turns. However, with every turn, wonderful vistas appeared. About 30 minutes, we arrived at the starting point – Stewart Creek car park. The blue Lake Hawea sparkled and mountain peaks glistened in the morning sun.

Isthmus Peak Track (16km) is in the Matatiaho Conservation Area. The track is closed from 20 November till 20 December. No booking is required for this day hike. We started the hike at 0930. The initial part of the track is climbing over a rocky terrain and passing foraging sheep and cattle. The views off Lake Hawea were stunning against the blue sky. The hike continue uphill through grassland. After 1.5 hours, the track is narrow with loose gravel cut along the slope of the mountain. The track zig zags up hugging the slope and in places with precipitous drops. Tussock grasses dominate this open landscape. It is exposed and can be very hot like today. Water (refilling) is not available and therefore it is essential to bring your own. This is an alpine area and strong wind and cold conditions can occur at any time. Some area are prone to avalanches when the mountains are covered in snow.

The strong sun was relentless and made walking harder. As the track twisted and turned, the summit seemed just there. However, upon reaching, we realised that there is another peak ahead. This continued for a while. With gain in altitude, the views across the mountains and valleys became ever panoramic and stunning. At this stage, only Lake Hawea was visible. Flowering alpine plants and shrubs appeared sporadically.  We could only see a few hikers on the mountain today.

Climbing slowly from one peak to yet another seemed like the track is endless. We arrived at a sign posted junction (1386 m) – Isthmus Peak to the right and Glen Dene Ridge Track to the left. As we gained elevation along a fence, Lake Wanaka come into view with the snowy peaks of the alps in the background.  The views were stunning in the bright light with deep blue sky. After several switchbacks and false peaks, we walked uphill on a grassy track. A pole was erected at the end. Finally the summit. The views of both Lakes – Wanaka and Hawea were stupendous. The pain to get here melted away by the euphoric sensation of the snowy peaks, jagged mountains and the deep blue sky and lakes.

We retraced our steps back on the same track back towards the car park. The weather was relentlessly hot. Although the sun had shifted, the views of the jagged snowy peaks and the mesmerising blue lakes were stunning. Just before we descended  into the bush, we managed to spot a couple of wild deer. It was an exhausting 7 hours hike but certainly worth it. This track has been comparable to Roy’s Peak Track, closer to Wanaka. Roy Peak Track  is shorter and more accessible making it popular. However, Isthmus Peak Track is certainly a wonderful hike with wonderful views of both Wanaka and Hawea lakes.

We continued on to Makarora, at the top end of Lake Wanaka along Makarora River. Stopped for a deserved lunch at Wonderland lodge. We continued towards Haast Pass to a sign posted Blue Pools, Mt Aspiring car park. After the first swing bridge over the Makarora River, it was refreshing to walk under tree canopies and board walk compared to the exposed Isthmus Peak Track. In about 20 minutes, we crossed the second swing bridge over Blue River which merged with the main Makarora River just meters away. Today, the water, although clear, was green. The blue colour is derived from the glacial melt waters from the mountains. Plus, it is also determined by the light on the day. It is certainly inviting to jump into the cold fast moving river. It is one of those natural sites that is worth visiting.

Northern Tongariro Circuit photos

These are my photos of Hiking the Northern Tongariro Circuit, New Zealand in early December 2020. This is one of the best hikes in New Zealand as the track is located in an active volcanic area complete with craters, solidified waves of ancient lava flows, unique alpine flora and landscape, fuming fumaroles and ice covered scared mountains.

Hiking the Red Tarn Track, Mt Cook

Red Tarn Track is located at Aoraki Mt Cook National Park, New Zealand. This is a half day (one-way) track with an elevation gain of 300m.

A short drive to the public car park and shelter is the starting point of the track. First walk through beech forest at Governors Bush Walk. With a short stroll, we emerged out of the bush and easy walk across Blackbirch Stream bridge. From thereon, it is a uphill climb through a series of steps (est 1750 only). This is Mt Sebastpol, the lowest mountain in Aoraki Mt Cook NP.  As I gained elevation, panoramic views of Mt Cook, Mt Sefton and Mt Wakefield, the village changed. The vegetation also changed with the elevation.The track twists and turns, always ascending. At one point, the climb is over rocks and steep in places.

With more steps, eventually, I walked onto a small meadow of alpine plants. A place to sit, snack and read the interpretive board. A few more steps, we reached two small tarns. The red (tarn – alpine lake) is derived from the reddish carnivorous pond weed Drosera spp – Sundew plants, that grew on the fringes of the marsh. A great place to see the reflections of Mt Cook (evening). We lingered for a while. A couple of ducks flew into the cold pond for a bit of frolicking. The tarn is a great place for reflection – views and life, I guess.

Beyond the tarns, a track leads up on rough slopes to the summit of Mt Sebastapol. Some serious effort is required for this hike.

The views of the mountains and alpine scenery is superb. This demanding (due to numerous steps) track is worth the 2hrs return climb.

New Plymouth photos

These are photos of our July 2020 New Plymouth journey. This is my first travel to Taranaki. My image of this city is farmland, dairy cows and Mt Taranaki. I managed to see this image after descending from our Puoakai Crossing hike in glorious sunset light.

Please read my Things to do in New Plymouth