Tag Archives: Hiking in New Zealand

Hiking the blue lakes and Tasman Glacier Track

Haupapa/Tasman Glacier Track (2.7km) is one of the easier walks in Aoraki/ Mt Cook National Park. The drive towards Tasman Lake is stunning. The grand views of Mt Johmson, The Armchair, Nuns Veil and several more just before crossing the Hooker River bridge is spectacular. The drive continued along Mt Wakefield to a car park.

From the car park, it is a gradual climb through a series of steps. With elevation gain, the Blue Lakes became visible, nestled at the base of the mountains. They were glacial lakes with a blue tinge. The blue, in earlier days, were glacial melt-waters permeating through moraines. Over time, the glacier height dropped and water flow diminished. With rain water, algae developed and turned the colour green.

Towards the top, the track is rocks and debris left behind when the glacier retreated. Today, Tasman Glacier is 27km, the longest in New Zealand. It has retreated significantly since late 1990s. That’s when the lake was formed. At this height, the snow and ice covered mountains which included Mt Cook, Mt Tasman, The Alcolyte and Nuns Veil were stupendous.

The fractured appearance of Tasman glacier’s terminal face, the dirt covered glacier head, the turquoise lake and the braided Tasman River (joined by the Hooker River) leading towards Lake Pukakai in the south, is quite a sight. Yes, the suggested walking time is 45 minutes. However, be prepared to linger much longer, in the cold, as the views here are quite captivating. Imagine, this lake was only created 20 years ago. Sadly, Tasman Glacier’s terminal face may retreat further with rise in temperature. Go now!

Hiking the Rocky Mountain Summit Track

The road from Wanaka passed through “That Wanaka Tree” and towards Glendhu Bay passing the start point of the popular Roys Peak Track. It was closed for lambing season. At Glendhu Bay, there were stunning views of Mt Aspiring and the surrounding mountains reflected on the pebbled beach bay.

The scenic ride continued into Matukituki Valley.  The road is hemmed between mountains, pastoral land with views of Lake Wanaka. The starting point of Rocky Mountain Hike is at Diamond Lake Conservation Area. (Refer to DoC for more information).

The start is a steep climb on gravel road and descends into the bush. The walk skirted the deep blue lake with sound of aquatic birds. At a junction, a series of wooden steps climbed onto the rocky mountain. It twisted and turned with buzzing sound of bees.  I took the eastern track which provided elevated views of Diamond Lake. Along the track were several specimens of flowering tree Fuchsia (kōtukutuku) with their distinctive brown barks peeling off. The view of the cobalt blue Diamond Lake contrasted by the greenery of the bush was stunning.

I continued on the eastern route and came into expansive views of Lake Wanaka, the surrounding farmlands and snow covered mountains including Roys Peak. It was quite exhilarating. The trail, now narrowed, zig zagged uphill over boulders and steep climb. Tui bird calls filled the mountain air. The views of the lake and mountains improved. Another choice. This time I choose the western route. Climbed over boulders, with all four limbs employed in places, on the way to the summit. There were fantastic views of Matukituki Valley. Finally a clearing and a grassy track led to the summit. On the west, snow and glacier covered peaks. A road zigzagged up the ski fields at Treble Cone Mountain. Mt Aspiring’s (Tititea, in Māori, means ‘steep peak of glistening white’) – icy sharp peaks and many more are visible.

The summit of Rocky Mountain is flat with a collection of rocks. On the east, great views of stunning Lake Wanaka, islands dotted around in the lakes, tail end of Matukituki River which drained into the lake and the mountains beyond. The climb is worth just for the expansive and spectacular views.

I retraced my steps back and circled Diamond Lake. Trees were lush with bird songs. On the water’s edge, marshes covered with reeds and other aquatic plants. As I exited the lake, a single duck fed frantically on the grassy marshes. This 3 hours return intermediate  hike is a great way to view this spectacular region.

Hiking Isthmus Peak Track

We left Wanaka and head towards Makarora on one of the most scenic drive along the blue Lake Hawea. We stopped at a dam on the lake near the small Hawea township at the southern end of the lake. Towards the north, snow peaked mountains of the Southern Alps. That was enough incentive for me to continue. The road twisted and turned with sharp hairpin turns. However, with every turn, wonderful vistas appeared. About 30 minutes, we arrived at the starting point – Stewart Creek car park. The blue Lake Hawea sparkled and mountain peaks glistened in the morning sun.

Isthmus Peak Track (16km) is in the Matatiaho Conservation Area. The track is closed from 20 November till 20 December. No booking is required for this day hike. We started the hike at 0930. The initial part of the track is climbing over a rocky terrain and passing foraging sheep and cattle. The views off Lake Hawea were stunning against the blue sky. The hike continue uphill through grassland. After 1.5 hours, the track is narrow with loose gravel cut along the slope of the mountain. The track zig zags up hugging the slope and in places with precipitous drops. Tussock grasses dominate this open landscape. It is exposed and can be very hot like today. Water (refilling) is not available and therefore it is essential to bring your own. This is an alpine area and strong wind and cold conditions can occur at any time. Some area are prone to avalanches when the mountains are covered in snow.

The strong sun was relentless and made walking harder. As the track twisted and turned, the summit seemed just there. However, upon reaching, we realised that there is another peak ahead. This continued for a while. With gain in altitude, the views across the mountains and valleys became ever panoramic and stunning. At this stage, only Lake Hawea was visible. Flowering alpine plants and shrubs appeared sporadically.  We could only see a few hikers on the mountain today.

Climbing slowly from one peak to yet another seemed like the track is endless. We arrived at a sign posted junction (1386 m) – Isthmus Peak to the right and Glen Dene Ridge Track to the left. As we gained elevation along a fence, Lake Wanaka come into view with the snowy peaks of the alps in the background.  The views were stunning in the bright light with deep blue sky. After several switchbacks and false peaks, we walked uphill on a grassy track. A pole was erected at the end. Finally the summit. The views of both Lakes – Wanaka and Hawea were stupendous. The pain to get here melted away by the euphoric sensation of the snowy peaks, jagged mountains and the deep blue sky and lakes.

We retraced our steps back on the same track back towards the car park. The weather was relentlessly hot. Although the sun had shifted, the views of the jagged snowy peaks and the mesmerising blue lakes were stunning. Just before we descended  into the bush, we managed to spot a couple of wild deer. It was an exhausting 7 hours hike but certainly worth it. This track has been comparable to Roy’s Peak Track, closer to Wanaka. Roy Peak Track  is shorter and more accessible making it popular. However, Isthmus Peak Track is certainly a wonderful hike with wonderful views of both Wanaka and Hawea lakes.

We continued on to Makarora, at the top end of Lake Wanaka along Makarora River. Stopped for a deserved lunch at Wonderland lodge. We continued towards Haast Pass to a sign posted Blue Pools car park. After the first swing bridge over the Makarora River, it was refreshing to walk under tree canopies and board walk compared to the exposed Isthmus Peak Track. In about 20 minutes, we crossed the second swing bridge over Blue River which merged with the main Makarora River just meters away. Today, the water, although clear, was green. The blue colour is derived from the glacial melt waters from the mountains. Plus, it is also determined by the light on the day. It is certainly inviting to jump into the cold fast moving river. It is one of those natural sites that is worth visiting.

Northern Tongariro Circuit photos

These are my photos of Hiking the Northern Tongariro Circuit, New Zealand in early December 2020. This is one of the best hikes in New Zealand as the track is located in an active volcanic area complete with craters, solidified waves of ancient lava flows, unique alpine flora and landscape, fuming fumaroles and ice covered scared mountains.

Hiking the Red Tarn Track, Mt Cook

Red Tarn Track is located at Aoraki Mt Cook National Park, New Zealand. This is a half day (one-way) track with an elevation gain of 300m.

A short drive to the public car park and shelter is the starting point of the track. First walk through beech forest at Governors Bush Walk. With a short stroll, we emerged out of the bush and easy walk across Blackbirch Stream bridge. From thereon, it is a uphill climb through a series of steps (est 1750 only). This is Mt Sebastpol, the lowest mountain in Aoraki Mt Cook NP.  As I gained elevation, panoramic views of Mt Cook, Mt Sefton and Mt Wakefield, the village changed. The vegetation also changed with the elevation.The track twists and turns, always ascending. At one point, the climb is over rocks and steep in places.

With more steps, eventually, I walked onto a small meadow of alpine plants. A place to sit, snack and read the interpretive board. A few more steps, we reached two small tarns. The red (tarn – alpine lake) is derived from the reddish carnivorous pond weed Drosera spp – Sundew plants, that grew on the fringes of the marsh. A great place to see the reflections of Mt Cook (evening). We lingered for a while. A couple of ducks flew into the cold pond for a bit of frolicking. The tarn is a great place for reflection – views and life, I guess.

Beyond the tarns, a track leads up on rough slopes to the summit of Mt Sebastapol. Some serious effort is required for this hike.

The views of the mountains and alpine scenery is superb. This demanding (due to numerous steps) track is worth the 2hrs return climb.

New Plymouth photos

These are photos of our July 2020 New Plymouth journey. This is my first travel to Taranaki. My image of this city is farmland, dairy cows and Mt Taranaki. I managed to see this image after descending from our Puoakai Crossing hike in glorious sunset light.

Please read my Things to do in New Plymouth

Pouakai Crossing photos

In mid-July , my family and I did the Pouakai Crossing in Egmont National Park in New Plymouth. It was an epic 9 hours walk through refreshing temperate forest, alpine swamps, volcanic formations, alpine tarns and ‘Goblin Forest’. All in the shadow of the mighty Mt Taranaki. These are my photos of that one day hike.

Please read my Hiking the Pouakai Crossing Track.

Hiking the Hooker Valley Track, Mt Cook

Hooker Valley, Aoraki Mount Cook National Park. The track starts at the White Horse Camping ground. Car parks are available.

The track begins through low bush on a stony track. Side tracks lead to Freda and Memorial. In about 15 minutes, we reached the Muller Lake lookout. The milky lake is fed by the melt-waters of Muller Glacier. The Hooker River drains into Muller Lake and carries on under the 1st swing bridge away from Hooker Valley.  Above the lake is the formidable looking Sefton Mountain (3151m) and further left, the Sealy Range. A small avalanche happened with a loud rumbling of ice. Then, the impact, with  thunderous collapse of an ice wall. Beyond the moraine wall (created when Muller Glacier retreated) on the right, lies Hooker Valley.

The track continued through low bush strewn with large rocks and boulders. Looking back, in the distance, a strip of gleaming turquoise water- Lake Pukaki. Then crossed a 2nd swing bridge with the massive ice covered Mt. Sefton in the background. Mt Cook (3724 m) came into view. The track is now a long boardwalk. Tussock grasses covered the valley. The Hooker River wound its way down the valley and eventually drained in Lake Pukaki. We crossed the 3rd swing bridge. A side track brought me to a small tarn with a view and reflection of Mt Cook and the neighbouring mountains.

A short hike between huge boulders and a short climb over crumbling moraine brought us the track’s end – the stunning and captivating – Hooker Lake viewpoint. Visibility was fantastic. Icebergs floated in the lake below. Mt Cook, the tallest in New Zealand, is almost touching distance.

At the end of the lake, Hooker Glacier reflected brightly. On the left, Mt Footstool rose steeply. All these mountains, glaciers and lakes are part of the extensive Southern Alps. We stopped for lunch.

A small track led towards the lake’s edge. Rocks and small boulders strewn all over. The sun was intense. Watching the icebergs bob around is mesmerising. Numerous glaciers on the mountains peaks reflected strongly in the afternoon sun. A waterfall cascaded down from glaciers above a steep slope. The views are captivating. The picture was complete – blue sky, snowy mountain peaks including the formidable Mt Cook, bright sunshine, placid icy water and crystal clear ice floating about. All to the sounds of gushing waterfall – head water of the Hooker River. Simply stunning.

Total time taken for the 10 km return hike – 3.5 hrs. This is relatively an easy half day walk on mostly level terrain. No permits or booking required. Just be prepared for the weather. Bring some lunch. Best time to hike is sunrise or sunset. Midday sun is intense. Sadly, all glaciers in the region are melting away due to low snowfall and higher melting rates. These mountains will not look the same  (less ice) in the next 20 years. Refer to  DoC – Hooker Valley Track.

Hiking the Pouakai Crossing Track

It was mid-July, just after a month long Covid 19 lock down. We arrived late in New Plymouth after taking the long The Forgotten World Highway from Tamaranui to Stratford in wet and cloudy weather. However, today promised to be a fine day. We decided to do the 17km Pouakai Crossing – Mt. Taranaki’s (Mt Egmont) epic 9 hours day walk that circumnavigated the north eastern and western face. Please see my Pouakai Crossing photos

This is a great alternative to the often crowded Tongariro Crossing. Like the central plateau mountains, Mt Taranaki created its own weather – temperatures can drop and rise with adverse wind and rain conditions at any time. Preparedness in any weather is critical. No booking is required, except when huts are required. Please refer to DoC – Pouakai-Crossing

start – (North Egmont Visitor Center)



We drove to the Mangorei Road end car park. The dawn sky turned red with streaks of clouds. This is a one-way track. We organised a shuttle with Taranaki Mountain Shuttle. We were picked up promptly at 0730 by Rob and transferred to North Egmont Visitor Centre. This one-way option allowed us to complete the hike at our own pace (the return). Transport is available for both ends (start and finish). Ruapehu and Ngauruhoe mountains, with a blueish hue, in Tongariro National Park were visible from here.

Razorback ridge


The first part of the track is to Holly Hut. The hike began from the North Egmont Visitor Centre and goes uphill through cool  montane forest – mixed forest with trees covered in epiphytes, moss and lichens. A thick layer of clouds obscured any mountain view. This steep hike continued for about an hour  before emerging onto a razorback ridge with sub-alpine bush and scrub landscape. As the  lower clouds burnt off with the rising sun, some snow covered mountain views emerged. The track continued uphill  with sweeping views of the Taranaki plains, lime green scrub forest, Tasman Sea and the distant central plateau  icy Ruapehu and Ngauruhoe mountains. The morning sun lit up the landscape, warmed our bodies and further revealed more of the mountain. On the left slope was a transmission antenna.

Diffenbach Cliffs

The track skirted along the eastern face towards formidable but magnificent lava columns of the Diffenbach Cliffs. Parts of the lower slopes were covered with snow. Short parts of the track was flooded. We passed the towering cliffs which looked imposing but at the same time striking.   We continued and negotiated some climbing over rocks at the Boomerang Slips. A series of wooden steps eased the crossing. The next major obstacle was past the Boomerang Slip. Due to recent poor weather, a major landslide had occurred.  This prevented the track to continue along this path to Holly Hut. Fortunately, repairs had been carried out and now passable. It was basically a 30cm line across a steep loose rock face slope. Slowly but surely we crossed with fears of any mishaps. There is no time to stop and wonder. There was a bit of relief once we passed this point. Small streams of water fell over the rocks. We reached the Kokowai and Ahukawakawa Track junction at 1100. Finally, the whole symmetrical mountain was visible, including the snow peaked summit (2518 meters). A (near) perfect conical mountain similar to Mt Fuji. Today, there were about six  hikers on the track. With sunshine and cool air, it was a perfect day for this hike. The mountain god was kind with us today!

Holly Hut

From hereon, we took the Ahukawakawa Track which descended with views of the Pouakai Range and Ahukawakawa swamps in the valley below. The expansive views of the sea, and north eastern and north western plains were stunning. As we descended, the mixed forest returned and the vegetation became taller.  After an hour of winding down steps and track, we arrived at Holly Hut after crossing the slow flowing Minarapa Stream. Having climbed several mountain tracks, in torrential rain, streams can rise meters within a short period and become violent. This stream is no exception. We stopped at the empty hut for a well earned rest and lunch. The sun shined brightly and the dormant Taranaki conical peak was clear. From the hut, there is a track towards Bell Falls. We skipped this one hour return track to save time, energy and daylight (short days in winter) for the crossing. 

Ahukawakawa Swamp

With the body refuelled, we retraced out steps over the stream and continued on the Ahukawakawa Track. Within 20 minutes of walking on water saturated wooden planks, we entered the swamps covered with red tussock grasses, sphagnum moss, flax and aquatic plants. This unique micro-climate is home to some endemic plants and animals. The god mountain Taranaki was fully exposed. It was magnificent. A raised wooden viewing platform was the ideal place to stop and take in the stunning views – Taranaki, the 3500 years old alpine wetland – the Ahukawakawa swamps and the Pouakai Range. All in one gentle sweep. A long boardwalk, underwater in places, brought us to a bridge over the clear Stony River. The  30 minutes wetland walk continued towards Pouakai Range. It was scramble to climb up as the path is wet and muddy in places. However, the ascend presented fantastic views of this ancient landscape. It is so quiet.

The track climbed steeply through moss covered mountain ceder (kaikawakawa) and mixed forest, we reached the Pouakai Track junction. Turning right towards Pouakai Hut, the gentle climb reached a 1400 meter high plateau strewn with rocks. The track is over wooden boardwalk. Within 20 minutes, we reached another junction – one leading downhill towards Pouakai Hut and Mangorei track. The other continue downhill on the Pouakai track towards North Egmont Visitor Center. An iconic tarn is also located along this track , within 20 minutes. Continuing on boardwalks in this pleasant landscape led us towards a tarn (alpine lake). Iconic because, it presented a chance to capture a reflection of Taranaki! However, your faith must be even stronger for the pool to be still with no breeze and off course, Taranaki to be exposed. This is a fragile environment and only walk on the boardwalks. It was crowded when we arrived here. We had taken 6 hours to get here. However, this tarn can be accessed via the Mangorei Track ( our trail end), perhaps within 2 hours. Some people looked like they have just arrived here after a shopping spree in the city. Poor attire and footwear can be disastrous should the weather turn for the worse. Furthermore, not many understand the fragile and scared nature of the environment (walking onto the ground and water). One Kiwi couple told me that they are waiting for sunset to capture ‘that Instagram photo’. 

We could not linger anymore. We retraced out walk back towards Pouakai Hut. Once we began descending on the eastern slope, Taranaki was no more. The expansive sight of the plains, Mt. Ruapehu and Tasman Sea was still clear. Initially we descended the dark, humid and twisted Kamahi trees covered with moss and lichens. There were hardly any birdsong. The sun could hardly penetrate through the dense canopy. This has been labelled the Goblin Forest.  The track is now only boardwalks. Ground and tree ferns appeared together with a broad leafs, including beech forest, as we descended on the Mangorei Track. Continuous walk on the hard material was tough of the feet. After two hours, we emerged out of the forest and reached the trail end. 

reaching the end – Mangorei Trail end

 

The wonderful but demanding Pouakai Crossing had taken 9 hours of hiking through temperate and beech forest, sub-alpine bush, ancient swamps, Goblin Forest, rugged and wild landscape, expansive views and past volcanic formations. All,  in the shadow of the mighty Taranaki.

Legends say that  – Taranaki once lived in the central plateau with male mountains – Tongariro, Ruapheu and Nagurhoe.  A scuffle broke out between Tongariro and Taranaki when the latter began flirting with a female mountain, Pihanga. Taranaki carved the land as he fled with tears – now the Whanganui River and rested in New Plymouth (Ngāmotu). He continued to cry, hence the frequent incidence of rainfall.  He hid his tears, hence the mountain is often obscured in clouds.

Today, Taranaki gifted us with a rare ‘good’ day. We stayed in New Plymouth for five days, we only saw it for one day.