Tag Archives: Hakatere Conservation Area

Hiking Mt Sunday

Just round a bend on the Hakatere Potts Road, across a bridge over Potts River, the expansive views of Mt Sunday – a rocky outcrop carved by glaciers, the glistening backdrop of the Southern Alps and the braided and slow flowing Rangitata River, was stunning. 

From the car park, the hike is estimated 1.5 hours return. The land from here to Mt Sunday is farmland with cattle grazing on the sunny day. A thick band of cloud hung steadfastly just below the summits. Leafless short scrub bush are scattered on the grassy fields. Along a fast flowing Deep Creak , tussock grass is dominant. Asburton Lakes area has some unique plants and animals. One such animal is the rare upland long jaw galaxias (fish) whcih can be spotted in this creek. The Rangitata River and the surrounding creeks are also spawning ground for Chinook or King Salmon.

We crossed a suspension bridge with views of The Pyramids (1748m), Mt Potts (2184m -another hike) and Mt Arrowsmith in the east. The mountains are bare and the bases covered in grass. The walk is relatively flat and the hardest part is wondering how to negotiate around cattle that determinedly stare at you. Give them wider berth as there is room to maneuver.

The final part is a climb over a grassy field towards the top of Mt Sunday. The top is a rocky outcrop. However, the 360 degrees of views of the The Southern Alps, Rangitata River and Potts Range is absolutely stunning against a deep blue sky. The Havelock, Lawrence and Clyde Rivers merged from the Southern Alps to form the mighty Rangitata River. Over the mountains in the west lies Mt Cook and Lakes Pukaki and Tekapo.

Mt Sunday was the site of Edoras in the Lord of the Ring movie. Whether you’re a fan or not, for a little effort, the reward is priceless. On the return, nearing the car park, water birds frolicked in the cold fast flowing creek almost hidden amongst the golden tussocks grasses. This is s good day out. Incidentally, Mt Sunday got its name from the riders in nearby high country stations whom would meet here on Sundays.

Hiking to Lake Emma Historic Hut

On our return journey from our hike to Mt Sunday, on the one main road, we stopped at Lake Emma and Roundabout. The sun was still bright and we decided to hike around the lake to a historic Lake Emma Hut. Against a backdrop of the looming Mt Harper and distant snow peaked mountains, Lake Emma is sits in an idyllic location.

From the car park, it is an easy walk along the shore. The vegetation is a mixture of tussock and grasses. Water reeds populated the water’s edge. A 4WD track, visibly used, led all the way to the hut. In the water, black swans flocked together foraging. We decided to walk all the way towards the historic hut on the south side of the lake.

Lake Emma Hut was built in the late 1860s. It is so quite here. Even the swans dare not disturb the silence. Entering the hut felt a little spooky. Above a cast iron wood stove, graffiti is scribbled all over. I did not linger too long. This hut is not in use. A track led behind the hut, skirted the foot of the Harper Range towards Lake Camp. A side trail detoured back to car park. However, it encompassed wading/crossing a swamp. We opted to retrace our track back to the car park. It seemed like a long slog back in the relentless hot afternoon sun shining directly onto our faces. It is an easy two hour return walk. We returned to Methvan.

Hakatere/Ashburton Lakes Wilderness

This morning we drove back to Mt Sommers and onward to Hakatere Conservation Area via the Ashburton Gorge Road. It covered about 60,000 hectares between two great rivers – Rakaia and Rangitata. The landscape is covered with tussock land, stunning lakes and braided rivers, bog and wetlands, impressive wild snow peaked mountains and farmlands. The Ashburton Lakes included Lakes Clearwater, Emma, Camp and Roundabout. All this just two hours drive from Christchurch.

At a historic Hakatere Station, built in late 1800, sealed road turned to gravel but the sights of snow peaked mountains and stunning lakes lifted my spirits. Driving carefully, I began to take in the ‘wilderness’ of this place. There is something exhilarating when I see clear water and snowy peaks. Here, those views are everywhere. There was hardly any car on the gravel road. We reached Lake Camp. Signs of civilisation. A cluster of permanent homes/batches towards the end of the lake. Interestingly, a public telephone! The Harper Range reflected on the still Lake Camp.

Driving across to Lake Clearwater, another cluster of camper vans occupied the lake’s shores. The Southern Alps, although distant reflected on its surface. The clarity here is astounding. I spoke to a local couple and they mentioned that all accommodation here are privately owned and there is no accommodation available. Perhaps, one or two owners may rent out their property by word of mouth. There are in fact a few properties/lodges available within this conservation area but are priced steeply! This included Lake Heron Station and Arrowsmith Lodge. Campsite and huts on some hiking tracks are available too.

We continued out slow drive on gravel road until we approached what looked like the end. Not really. We crossed a bridge near the mouth of Potts River which drained into the braided and wide Rangitata River. The sight towards the river basin and mountains was stunning. Gorgeous views of the head waters of Rangitata River – with sources from Clyde, Lawrence and Havelock Rivers, Mt D’Archiac, Mt Potts and Mt Sunday. All part of the magnificent Southern Alps. Soon, we passed the expensive Mt Potts Lodge. It is a long slow drive to get here but it is worth it. Plus,with options to climb Mt Potts and Mt Sunday. We choose Mt Sunday – the site of Edoras (Lord of the Ring).